A Brief Tribute to Sir Roger Moore

I always found Roger Moore (1927-2017) as Simon Templar in the 1960s TV series THE SAINT (and, later, as British spy James Bond, 007 on the big screen) to be wonderfully suave, poised, and good humored. His on screen persona was a balm during my troubled adolescence, at which time I so longed for more sense of order, confidence, and effectiveness. Moore gracefully embodied all of these qualities. Admittedly, he had no sex appeal for me, but neither did Sean Connery, his predecessor in the James Bond movie franchise. I’m thankful to the late Sir Roger Moore for uniquely enriching my inner life, including being somewhat of a role model for me in my youth.

Scary Dog Moment

Two nights ago, during my evening power walk, I experienced some interesting encounters. Someone’s pit bull mix came charging at me on one of the neighborhood streets I stroll along every night. Fortunately, between my shouting the dog down and her owner’s commands, I was not bitten. A short while later, the owner caught up with me in her car and apologized profusely and repeatedly. It turned out she’s pregnant and I’m the second passerby the canine had recently gone after as if out for blood. I explained that her dog can smell and sense her owner’s pregnancy and is in protector mode. I also angrily emphasized that the local leash law must be upheld. The owner promised to always follow that rule from now on. We introduced ourselves and she said she never wants me to feel afraid to walk on the street on which she, her husband, and their dog live. I calmed down and walked some extra blocks— including uphill— to thoroughly unwind.

Life has its little surprises, but still is good.

Mini Movie Review (CAPERNAUM)

The Lebanese movie CAPERNAUM (2018), with its subtitle translation being “Chaos,” blew me away. I can’t remember the last time I watched more riveting, powerful acting than what twelve-year-old (now aged sixteen) Syrian refugee, Zain Al Rafeea, delivers here. Taking place in the slums of Beirut, the story focuses on a streetwise, impoverished boy who tries to protect his eleven-year-old sister from being married off to their family’s landlord. Surrounded by squalor and pain, Zain (also the name of the main character) bravely faces what life throws at him. Filmed in documentary, hand-held camera style, the sense of intimacy and immediacy is constant. I highly recommend this phenomenal film.

Healing as a Form of Magic

It’s been said elsewhere that magic is a change in consciousness. Healing is one such form of magic. Also, magic equally involves both the recipient and the initiator of it, whereby both parties are directly affected.

I am so grateful to be doing healing work, which truly often feels magical. I’m healing while my clients are too. Thank the gods for this calling I’m in (trauma psychotherapist) whilst so much of the world around us is scarily out of control. I may not have much effectiveness directly out there. But, more up close in my life, I’m reminded that I wield good healing power, which I handle with utmost care and respect.

Movie Review (I AM DRAGON)

The Russian language movie I AM DRAGON (2015) is often a visual poem. It is that beautifully made. Based on a Russian fairytale, the story is quite simple: A nobleman’s daughter is kidnapped by a dragon on her wedding day, thus resuming a horrifying tradition the villagers had thought ended a few generations back. The young bride-to-be must then contend with living on an enchanted isle where she soon finds out there is far more to the hosting dragon than initially meets the eye. Emotional intrigue and opening of hearts ensue.

There are definitely parallels in this story with BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. Cinematography and CGI weave gracefully together throughout this colorful production along with solid– often purposefully dramatic– acting by the two attractive leads (Maria Poezzhaeva and Matvey Lykov) and supporting cast. But, then, dramatic situations so often elicit dramatic responses. Well-crafted sets (CGI enhanced in places) and lovely costumes round out the exquisiteness of this film.

I’m humbly reminded here and by a few other recently-viewed productions that America is not the only producer of well-made high tech. movies, including those that excel in both style/look and emotional substance. I AM DRAGON is one such cinema masterpiece.

Mini Movie Review (THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER and THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER II: THE SERPENT GIFT)

THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER II: THE SERPENT GIFT (released in early 2019) is a fantastic sequel to the fabulous Danish movie THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER (2015). These appear to be the first two parts of a trilogy. I was impressed with how a heroine and hero were each presented in both screen plays, especially in the second one, where the male protagonist (Jakob Oftebro as Nicodemus Ravens) matures and comes into his own, thanks largely to the young female lead, Dina (Rebecca Emilie Sattrup). Like her mother, Melussina (Maria Bonnevie), she has the innate power to see into people’s souls, namely over what they feel ashamed about.

The balance and tension of the sacred feminine and the sacred masculine are well-portrayed in these movies, which are set sometime in Medieval period (probably the 15th century) Dunark, a land where dragons and a giant serpent exist. I was often deeply moved, particularly over Dina and how she evolves, developing more psychic powers in the second installment.

These two films are exquisite pieces of cinema, from the beautiful outdoor cinematography– which there is even more of in the second film– to the great acting, sets, and costumes. The evil throne usurper’s aged mother (Dama Lizea, played by Stina Ekblad) is a top notch villainess, embodying sinister artfully and grandly.

Both movies are must-sees for anyone who enjoys a good story of both adventure and human transformation

Political Plug and Rant: I Support U.S. Senator Edward Markey

I’m struck with what seems like ageism and superficialness overly influencing the Democratic primary race for the U.S. Senate seat here in Massachusetts. I’m supporting the incumbent Ed Markey for re-election. His voting record and particular issues he’s impassioned about have long impressed me. I’m left thinking, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” I appreciate his Green New Deal proposal, which he worked closely on with young and vibrant Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio- Cortez. She clearly respects and values him as a close ally and collaborator in Congress, as does Senator Warren. I’m grateful for Markey’s concern for the USPS and his advocacy to sufficiently fund it. To my knowledge, his environmental track record is excellent. Over the years, he’s been very responsive to me when I’ve written and emailed him with numerous concerns, many of them regarding the welfare of the environment. He’s been on the front lines fighting to ensure Internet neutrality. And as far as I know, he’s pro Medicare for All.

Along comes Congressman Kennedy– young and handsome and, well, a Kennedy. These attributes alone are not relevant for me. (I mean, we’re not talking here about filling a position for modeling stylish men’s clothing.) To my understanding, he’s comparatively more conservative than Markey, who continues to have plenty of energy and ideas to keep doing a great job as my U.S. Senator. I don’t mind that Markey is in his 70s and not a Kennedy. I haven’t heard that he’s having any major health problems. He’s not in need of being put out to pasture. I don’t think his age or lack of family fame should matter for voters. Only his long legislative and advocacy record should.

We don’t need this mid stream change during such trying times in federal government (and beyond), particularly when Markey is doing just fine in the Senate for me, the rest of his constituents, and the country at large. But, a substantial number of folks seem overly swayed by someone who’s simply young, good looking, and a Kennedy, his opponent’s legislative record and so much other hard work in Congress be damned.

I say, come on, Joe Kennedy, you could have waited a while longer before running for Senate, because you’ve got plenty of time, and directly support Markey in his solid, ongoing legacy of great work on behalf of Mass. and America overall.

Movie Review (MRS. McCUTCHEON)

The seventeen minute Australian movie MRS. McCUTCHEON (released in 2017) is a lovely little visual story. Directed by John Sheedy and filmed in bright colors reminiscent of many 1960s cinema productions, the screenplay shows some slices of life for a ten-year-old boy (Alec Golinger) who feels most natural and comfortable wearing a dress. He insists on being called Mrs. McCutcheon instead of his birth name Tom. We viewers eventually learn that he identifies as a she, expressing to her single mother Jenny (Nadine Garner) a sense that she was born in the wrong kind of body. Jenny enrolls the child in a third school within a single year, where a super perky teacher, Mrs. Clutterbuck (Virginia Gay), does her theatrical best to make Mrs. McCutcheon feel welcome in class.

A part white, part Aboriginal boy named Trevor (Wesley Patten) immediately befriends the trans protagonist, protecting her against intolerant peers, particularly from a group of three boys who proceed to steadily bully Mrs. McCutcheon. Trevor is a scrappy and talented athlete who loves his new classmate for who and how she is. He voices disappointment when his new friend is forced back into wearing boy’s clothes while at school.

The oppressive norm of compulsory conformity to birth-based binary gender expression and identity is upheld by Principal Parncut (Neil Pigot), a staid and constipated looking caricature of a man. He and the teacher Mrs. Clutterbuck are just two of several ways comic relief balance out the serious subject matter of the film. However, even uptight Mr. Parncut is overpowered by the positive, hopeful message at the very end, the final setting a balloon-filled dance in the school gym. The movie often has a dream-like quality to it, particularly this very last scene. Hence, idealism works well here, coupled with the narrative’s premise that diversity in every sense is a basic aspect of reality to be embraced for the good of humanity (however high a striving that may be in such a fear-filled world).

It is Trevor who so wisely, poignantly expresses the main point of the film in few words and actions. (Hint: It has to do with skin.) Wesley Patten’s acting hits the mark for sincerity and effectiveness. He should go places in his career, if he chooses to remain an actor, as the equally talented Grolinger should also succeed.

This short film was exactly what I needed to watch at the end of a work week peppered with ongoing news of intolerance around the country and the world. As long as clever, creative projects like MRS. McCUTCHEON continue to be made and released for the public (I viewed this for free via my basic Cable plan), there is hope that the world will perhaps eventually become a better place for everyone.

Movie Review (DEPARTURE)

On the surface, DEPARTURE (released in 2015) is a summertime coming of age movie. The screenplay also falls into the broad category of film and television productions about repressed English people. It is far more than either of these. I appreciated how emotional and sexual repression in the story are intelligently explored by writer and director Andrew Steggall. In different ways, the three British and one French main characters struggle to be free of emotional pain each has been carrying prior to the start of the story.

DEPARTURE takes place in the South of France, where young teenager and aspiring writer Elliot (sensitively played by Alex Lawther) roams the countryside and village near his family’s summer home, carrying his journal and jotting down words whenever inspiration strikes. These are his final days in this house, which his parents are selling due to their marriage dissolving. Elliot and his mother Beatrice (Juliet Stevenson) slowly, reluctantly begin to pack up and selectively dispose of the contents of the quaint, though somewhat cavernous dwelling. Lingering indoor and outdoor camera shots underscore the pensive, wistful mood throughout the movie.

Elliot’s father Philip (Finbar Lynch) spends the first part of the film being away on business. When we viewers do finally meet him, it soon becomes apparent that he is gay, having married a woman and fathered a child in hopes of avoiding his true orientation.

To get some space from his mother’s depression and their mutually sad, imminent closing of a large chapter in family life, Elliot initiates a friendship with the slightly older Clement (Phenix Brossard). The English boy initially spies the lithe teen swimming in the nearby reservoir. A triangle of sexual tension gradually ensues, with both mother and son longing for the attentions of Clement. The movie’s focus is largely on Elliot, who is coming into his sexuality. He does his best to sublimate libido and other powerful feelings by writing, yet he grows bolder in pursuing affection from Clement whenever possible.

Symbolism arises here and there, such as when Beatrice possibly (not at all for certain) runs over a deer while driving in a stormy night at the beginning of the story. Elliot spends the rest of the movie preoccupied with finding and burying this unseen roadkill. I could not help but think that the phantom deer is representative of Elliot’s parents’ dead marriage and the childhood he longs for both continuance of and closure over. Like the possibly dead deer whose existence is never confirmed, Elliot’s family life, now nonexistent as he had previously experienced it, was based on a false abstraction of love between his parents rather than something actual for them. In a sense, Beatrice kills off her own denial and avoidance of the truth about her sham marriage, though it still takes her a while into the narrative to finally face this reality. Hence, this nighttime incident is also a foreshadowing of what soon comes to a head for Elliot’s family. Her closeted, uptight husband Philip lived and perpetrated a lie in a heterosexual union, with the summer home purchased as both a distracting and distancing way of maintaining some common, primary pursuit (real estate purchases) between he and Beatrice. The remotely located house embodies the isolation and subsequent loneliness Elliot and his parents each feel.

A dead bird the protagonist comes across in the woods symbolizes the actual death of his innocent childhood from within the context of his parents’ illusion of love for each other and the risky transition into adulthood, including sexuality, he now faces. (Consequently, there is no need for Elliot to find the killed deer, but, not surprisingly, he doesn’t figure this out right away.) To at least drive the particular points home regarding adulthood and sexuality, Elliot plucks a few feathers from the small carcass and places them in his hair. He soon spots Clement up ahead as the older boy strips down for a swim. In a brief solitary reverie, Elliot plays with the idea of being seen like a bird showing its plumage to display beauty, physical maturity, and confidence, and also, likely, in hopes of getting attention from a possible mate. However, he soon thinks better of wearing this added decor and removes the feathers for when Clement actually sees him. Actor Alex Lawther’s soulful eyes, thoughtful facial expressions, and deliberating movements powerfully relay so much pent-up adolescent passion.

A prescient, recurring dream image of Elliot floating naked underwater feels haunting to watch. The question is whether he will be drowned by his deep emotions and desire or learn to swim in life like all of us adults with a libido and intermittently intense feeling states must do. His gift of the ability to creatively write about feelings and observations hints at the hope we viewers can hold for him as he navigates a maturing, complex psyche.

As a gay man who was once a teenager, I certainly related to Elliot and the very limited options presented to him for sexual exploration with another male. Clement spends a lot of time trying to fix an old motorcycle to then drive on to Paris, where we eventually learn his ailing mother lies dying in hospital. He has basically been exiled to stay with an aunt in the country due to anger management issues, stemming from the helplessness he feels over his mother’s plight and his father’s lack of patience and understanding. He smokes cigarettes and sometimes wears a leather jacket, effectively portraying the trope of the angry loner male youth, though without seeming like a cliche. His mixed response to Elliot is painful yet believable to watch. On one hand, Clement clearly enjoys the admiration and desire from the younger peer, who welcomes his assistance with packing up the house and keeping Elliot company in the woods. On the other, the older boy’s internalized homophobia is expressed in his name-calling and insults, including of Elliot’s being a poet. Yet, the French boy flirts and displays himself just enough to help maintain some sexual tension between them. I found myself thinking how the protagonist could and will eventually do better with finding worthwhile, reciprocating love interests, his intelligence and sensibilities far more sophisticated than Clement’s. However, the intrigue of discovering sexual desire and pursuit of its fulfillment moves the narrative effectively along even with– and because of– the limitations presented for the English lad and, by extension, his suffering parents. The mother and father relay how repression, denial and avoidance are inevitably ineffective against hiding from the truth in matters of the heart and body.

I was surprised to learn that Alex Lawther was around eighteen years of age when he starred in this film. Casting older actors to play younger is common, of course, because wisdom and good acting ability often come with age. But, Lawther looks and acts so uncannily youthful (yet like an old soul) here that I thought he was surely no more than fifteen.

DEPARTURE is layered in meaning, cinematically beautiful, and superbly acted. The pacing is often a bit slow and ponderous, but not overly so. There were just enough emotionally and sexually charged interactions between the actors to sustain my interest throughout, which was also helped along by the movie’s intriguing visual appeal. The Southern French countryside and village setting come across as other main characters. And Lawther’s often subtle but rich range of facial and body expressions are quite riveting. I enjoyed this gem of a screenplay overall in spite of finding myself painfully empathizing with all four central players’ sexual and emotional frustrations, sadness, and anguish, especially Elliot’s and Beatrice’s respectively. But, I think we fellow human viewers are supposed to feel all this right along with them and glean some knowledge and beauty from out of the suffering wherever we can, like Elliot wisely strives to do.

Mini Movie Review (GODS OF EGYPT)

GODS OF EGYPT (2016) was a fun, campy, and often silly movie I’m glad I saw on TV for free. I especially enjoyed the costumes and some of the sets, both of which were often enhanced by CGI. I liked the main fantasy premise of an ancient time in which Egypt’s gods lived and ruled among humans. Most of the deities looked fabulous to some degree or other, while a few were sloppy and not impressive, namely when in their combined human-animal forms. To be clear, there is no particularly deep character development in this visually splashy, flashy production.

The cast should have been entirely made up of Egyptians and people of other African descent. A few token Blacks and brown-skinned folks in the ensemble, such as handsome Chadwick Boseman, didn’t cut it. The flack this movie got for such poor ethnic/racial optics was well-deserved and why I refused to buy a theater ticket for it. Movie studio brass should know and do better by now than to cast largely white people in non-white, non-Euro/American roles.