Mini Movie Review (THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER and THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER II: THE SERPENT GIFT)

THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER II: THE SERPENT GIFT (released in early 2019) is a fantastic sequel to the fabulous Danish movie THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER (2015). These appear to be the first two parts of a trilogy. I was impressed with how a heroine and hero were each presented in both screen plays, especially in the second one, where the male protagonist (Jakob Oftebro as Nicodemus Ravens) matures and comes into his own, thanks largely to the young female lead, Dina (Rebecca Emilie Sattrup). Like her mother, Melussina (Maria Bonnevie), she has the innate power to see into people’s souls, namely over what they feel ashamed about.

The balance and tension of the sacred feminine and the sacred masculine are well-portrayed in these movies, which are set sometime in Medieval period (probably the 15th century) Dunark, a land where dragons and a giant serpent exist. I was often deeply moved, particularly over Dina and how she evolves, developing more psychic powers in the second installment.

These two films are exquisite pieces of cinema, from the beautiful outdoor cinematography– which there is even more of in the second film– to the great acting, sets, and costumes. The evil throne usurper’s aged mother (Dama Lizea, played by Stina Ekblad) is a top notch villainess, embodying sinister artfully and grandly.

Both movies are must-sees for anyone who enjoys a good story of both adventure and human transformation

2 thoughts on “Mini Movie Review (THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER and THE SHAMER’S DAUGHTER II: THE SERPENT GIFT)

  1. Watching this movie and the first and after reading your post, I realized this may be the first time I’ve ever seen a movie that touched upon that innate ability sensitive people have that many times feels like a gift and at other times like a burden. They reminded me of just how careful we need to be when treading those turbulent waters. Indeed, eyes do seem to be the windows to the soul. Thank you for sharing your well-thought-out commentary which helps me see these movies through another set of eyes that have the ability to see the whole picture, not just the emotional content.

    Like

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